Alimentation animale

Gran Turismo 7s April update aims to appease angry fans and fix the grind

A recent Gran Turismo 7 update sparked outrage, not just because it raised the prices of in-game cars, but also because it led to a server outage than lasted for over a day. Now Polyphony Digital President Kazunori Yamauchi has issued an apology “for the frustration and confusion” caused by the patch, along with the announcement of a big update rolling out in early April to “improve player experience.” 

Players complained that the presence of microtransactions and higher car prices made it harder to obtain new vehicles and upgrades without paying real money and spending a lot of time grinding for in-game currency. Yamauchi said back then that he believes it’s important for the cars’ prices to be linked with their real-world counterparts to convey their “value and rarity.” 

That obviously didn’t go over well with fans, who also had to deal with downtime because the update came with an issue that prevented the game from starting properly on the PS4 and the PS5. The game ended up being review bombed on Metacritic, where it currently has a score of 1.5 that translates to “overwhelming dislike.”

The updates coming in early April include higher rewards for events, as well as more events and opportunities to earn in-game currency. Polyphony is also working on more additional features that don’t have a release date yet, such as the ability to sell cars. At the moment, there’s no way to do so in GT7, even though its predecessors had the feature. 

Unfortunately, Yamauchi didn’t mention whether the company is exploring the possibility of making the game available to play offline, so it will likely continue requiring an internet connection for the foreseeable future. He did say, however, that Polyphony is giving players who may have been affected by the server outage a credit pack of 1 million Cr. Only those who already own the game before his post had been published and who log in between March 25th and April 25th will get the free credit pack. 

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